First Corinthians Bible Study Video Series

Join Deacon Andrew Harrah as he leads the survey of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians, chapter by chapter. Corinth was an important city in ancient Greece. Geographically, it was an ideal hub for commerce between Italy and Asia. Along with the flow of merchandise, Corinth received travelers from both east and west, creating ethnic diversity among the city’s inhabitants. Although Corinth was ransacked by the Romans in 146 B.C., it was rebuilt by Julius Caesar in 46 B.C. Roman control of Corinth allowed them to dominate east-west commerce as well as the Isthmian Games (9:24-27), which were surpassed in importance only by the celebrated Olympic Games.

Corinth’s commercial success was rivaled only by its decadence. The immorality of Corinth was so well known that Aristophanes coined the Greek verb “korinthiazomai” (meaning to “act like a Corinthian”) as a synonym for fleshly immorality. Greek plays of the day often depicted Corinthians as those of low character. The Corinthians drew attention to their lewdness through their worship of Aphrodite, the goddess of love and beauty. Yet Corinth was also a strategic location for the propagation of the gospel. The city’s corrupt nature made for a unique opportunity to display to the Roman world the transforming power of Jesus Christ.

Acts 18:1-8 records the founding of the Corinthian church. St. Paul visited Corinth on his second missionary journey, after leaving Athens where his ministry proved disappointing. Upon entering Corinth, he made tents and preached in the synagogue on the Sabbath. After the Jews rejected St. Paul’s message, he began to reach out to the Gentiles. He ministered in Corinth for eighteen months, eventually establishing a church. This church, like the city, had a mixture of nationalities. Though some Jews had been converted, most of the believers were Gentiles (12:2).

While the Corinthian church reflected the city’s multinational character, it also mirrored some of Corinth’s immorality. The sharp tone of First Corinthians results from St. Paul’s urgent desire to get the church back on course.

Week 1 February 18, 2024

Deacon Andrew Harrah provides an introduction and overview of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians.

Week 2 February 25, 2024

Deacon Andrew Harrah discusses Chapter One of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians.

Week 3 March 3, 2024

Deacon Andrew Harrah discusses Chapter Two of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians.

Week 4 March 10, 2024

Deacon Andrew Harrah discusses Chapter Three of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians.

Week 5 March 17, 2024

Deacon Andrew Harrah discusses Chapter Four of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians.

Week 6 March 24, 2024

Deacon Andrew Harrah discusses Chapter Five of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians.

Week 7 March 31, 2024

Deacon Andrew Harrah discusses Chapter Six of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians.

Week 8 April 7, 2024

Deacon Andrew Harrah discusses Chapter Seven of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians.

Week 9 April 14, 2024

Deacon Andrew Harrah discusses Chapter Eight of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians.